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ICSE Class 9 Chemistry PDF: Download Selina Concise Chemistry Book for Free



ICSE Class 9 Chemistry Book PDF Free Download




Are you looking for a reliable and comprehensive source of learning chemistry for your ICSE class 9 exams? Do you want to download the ICSE class 9 chemistry book pdf for free and study at your own pace? If yes, then you have come to the right place. In this article, we will tell you everything you need to know about the ICSE class 9 chemistry book pdf, including its benefits, features, and how to download it. Read on to find out more.




Icse Class 9 Chemistry Book Pdf Free Download



Why Choose ICSE Class 9 Chemistry Book?




Chemistry is one of the most important subjects for ICSE class 9 students, as it lays the foundation for further studies in science. It also helps students develop logical thinking, analytical skills, and problem-solving abilities. However, chemistry can also be a challenging subject for many students, as it involves complex concepts, formulas, equations, and experiments. That's why choosing the right book for learning chemistry is crucial for your success.


One of the best books for ICSE class 9 chemistry is the Selina Concise Chemistry book published by Selina Publishers. This book is specially designed for ICSE class 9 students, following the latest syllabus prescribed by the Council for the Indian School Certificate Examinations (CISCE). It covers all the topics in a clear, concise, and comprehensive manner, with ample examples, diagrams, tables, and exercises. It also provides direct answers to all the questions in the book, making it easy for students to check their understanding and revise effectively.


Some of the benefits of using the ICSE class 9 chemistry book by Selina Publishers are:



  • It helps students master the fundamentals of chemistry and prepare well for their exams.



  • It provides a systematic and logical presentation of the topics, with a step-by-step approach.



  • It explains the concepts in a simple and lucid language, with relevant examples and illustrations.



  • It includes a variety of questions based on different levels of difficulty, such as multiple choice questions, short answer questions, long answer questions, numerical problems, etc.



  • It offers tips and tricks to solve problems quickly and accurately.



  • It enhances students' interest and curiosity in chemistry by relating it to real-life situations and applications.



How to Download ICSE Class 9 Chemistry Book PDF?




If you want to download the ICSE class 9 chemistry book pdf for free, you can follow these simple steps:



  • Go to the website https://www.jagranjosh.com/articles/icse-class-9-selina-chemistry-download-chapter-wise-pdfs-1681986651-1, which provides the chapter-wise pdfs of the ICSE class 9 chemistry book by Selina Publishers.



  • Select the chapter you want to download from the list of chapters given on the website.



  • Click on the download link given below the chapter name.



  • Save the pdf file on your device and open it with any pdf reader.



  • Enjoy reading and learning chemistry from the ICSE class 9 chemistry book pdf.



What are the Features of ICSE Class 9 Chemistry Book PDF?




The ICSE class 9 chemistry book pdf has many features that make it an ideal choice for students who want to learn chemistry in a fun and easy way. Some of these features are:


Chapter-wise PDFs




The ICSE class 9 chemistry book pdf is divided into 10 chapters, each covering a different topic of chemistry. The chapters are:



Chapter No.


Chapter Name


1


Matter and Its Composition


2


Study of Gas Laws


3


Elements, Compounds and Mixtures


4


The Language of Chemistry


5


Physical and Chemical Changes


6


Water


7


Atomic Structure and Chemical Bonding


8


The Periodic Table


9


Study of the First Element - Hydrogen


10


Study of Gas - Oxygen


Chapter 1: Matter and Its Composition




This chapter introduces the concept of matter and its composition. It explains the characteristics, states, and classification of matter. It also discusses the laws of chemical combination, Dalton's atomic theory, and atomic mass.


Some of the key points of this chapter are:



  • Matter is anything that has mass and occupies space.



  • Matter can exist in three states: solid, liquid, and gas.



  • Matter can be classified into pure substances and mixtures.



  • Pure substances can be further classified into elements and compounds.



  • Mixtures can be further classified into homogeneous and heterogeneous mixtures.



  • The law of conservation of mass states that mass can neither be created nor destroyed in a chemical reaction.



  • The law of constant proportions states that a given compound always contains the same elements in the same fixed ratio by mass.



  • Dalton's atomic theory states that matter is made up of tiny indivisible particles called atoms, which are identical for a given element but different for different elements.



  • The atomic mass of an element is the relative mass of one atom of that element as compared to the mass of one atom of carbon-12 taken as 12 units.



  • The molecular mass of a compound is the relative mass of one molecule of that compound as compared to the mass of one atom of carbon-12 taken as 12 units.




Chapter 2: Study of Gas Laws




This chapter deals with the study of gas laws, which describe the relationship between the pressure, volume, temperature, and amount of a gas. It explains Boyle's law, Charles' law, Gay-Lussac's law, Avogadro's law, and the ideal gas equation. It also introduces the concept of standard temperature and pressure (STP) and molar volume.


Some of the key points of this chapter are:



  • A gas is a state of matter that has no fixed shape or volume and can expand or contract to fill any container.



  • The pressure of a gas is defined as the force exerted by the gas molecules per unit area on the walls of the container.



Chapter 3: Elements, Compounds and Mixtures




This chapter explains the difference between elements, compounds and mixtures. It also describes the methods of separation of mixtures, such as filtration, evaporation, crystallization, sublimation, distillation, chromatography, etc.


Some of the key points of this chapter are:



  • An element is a pure substance that cannot be broken down into simpler substances by any physical or chemical means.



  • A compound is a pure substance that is formed by the chemical combination of two or more elements in a fixed ratio by mass.



  • A mixture is an impure substance that is formed by the physical combination of two or more substances in any ratio by mass.



  • A mixture can be separated into its components by using physical methods based on the differences in their physical properties.



  • Filtration is a method of separating an insoluble solid from a liquid by passing the mixture through a porous medium that retains the solid.



  • Evaporation is a method of separating a soluble solid from a liquid by heating the solution until the liquid evaporates and leaves behind the solid.



  • Crystallization is a method of separating a soluble solid from a liquid by cooling the solution until the solid forms crystals and separates out.



  • Sublimation is a method of separating a sublimable solid from a non-sublimable solid by heating the mixture until the sublimable solid changes directly from solid to gas and leaves behind the non-sublimable solid.



  • Distillation is a method of separating two or more liquids with different boiling points by heating the mixture until the liquid with lower boiling point vaporizes and condenses in a separate container.



  • Chromatography is a method of separating two or more soluble substances with different solubilities in a solvent by passing the solution through an absorbent medium that retains the substances at different rates.




Chapter 4: The Language of Chemistry




This chapter introduces the language of chemistry, which consists of symbols, formulas, equations, and valency. It explains how to write and name chemical symbols and formulas. It also explains how to balance chemical equations and calculate mole ratios. It also introduces the concept of valency and its types.


Some of the key points of this chapter are:



  • A chemical symbol is a shorthand notation that represents an element using one or two letters.



  • A chemical formula is a shorthand notation that represents a compound using symbols and numbers.



  • A chemical equation is a shorthand notation that represents a chemical reaction using symbols and formulas.



  • To balance a chemical equation, we have to adjust the coefficients of the reactants and products so that the number of atoms of each element is equal on both sides of the equation.



  • A mole ratio is the ratio of moles of one substance to moles of another substance in a balanced chemical equation.



  • Valency is the combining capacity of an atom or ion to form bonds with other atoms or ions.



  • Valency can be positive or negative depending on whether an atom or ion loses or gains electrons to form bonds.



  • The valency of an element can be determined by its position in the periodic table or by its electronic configuration.




Chapter 5: Physical and Chemical Changes




This chapter explains the difference between physical and chemical changes. It also describes the characteristics and examples of physical and chemical changes. It also discusses the types and effects of chemical changes, such as oxidation, reduction, corrosion, rancidity, etc.


Some of the key points of this chapter are:



  • A physical change is a change in which no new substance is formed and only the physical properties such as shape, size, state, colour, etc. change.



  • A chemical change is a change in which one or more new substances are formed and different chemical properties such as reactivity, flammability, acidity, etc. change.



  • A physical change is reversible while a chemical change is irreversible.



  • A physical change does not involve any energy change while a chemical change involves either absorption or release of energy.



  • Some examples of physical changes are melting of ice, boiling of water, cutting of paper, etc.



  • Some examples of chemical changes are burning of paper, rusting of iron, cooking of food, etc.



  • Oxidation is a chemical change in which a substance gains oxygen or loses hydrogen or electrons.



  • Reduction is a chemical change in which a substance loses oxygen or gains hydrogen or electrons.



  • Corrosion is a chemical change in which a metal is attacked by substances such as oxygen, water, acids, etc. and forms oxides, hydroxides, or salts.



  • Rancidity is a chemical change in which fats and oils are oxidized by air and become stale and unpleasant in smell and taste.




Chapter 6: Water




This chapter deals with the study of water, which is one of the most essential and abundant substances on earth. It explains the structure, properties, and uses of water. It also discusses the purification, hardness, and softening of water. It also introduces the concept of pH and its applications.


Some of the key points of this chapter are:



  • Water is a compound of hydrogen and oxygen with the formula H2O.



  • Water has a bent shape with an angle of 104.5 degrees between the two O-H bonds.



  • Water has many unique properties such as high boiling point, high specific heat capacity, high surface tension, universal solvent, etc. due to its polar nature and hydrogen bonding.



  • Water is essential for life and has many uses such as drinking, washing, cooking, agriculture, industry, etc.



  • Water can be purified by various methods such as filtration, distillation, chlorination, etc.



  • Hard water is water that contains dissolved salts of calcium and magnesium that prevent the formation of lather with soap.



  • Soft water is water that does not contain dissolved salts of calcium and magnesium and forms lather with soap easily.



  • Hard water can be softened by various methods such as boiling, adding washing soda, using ion exchange resins, etc.



  • pH is a measure of the acidity or alkalinity of a solution on a scale of 0 to 14.



  • pH can be determined by using indicators such as litmus paper, phenolphthalein, methyl orange, etc. or by using a pH meter.



  • pH has many applications such as in agriculture, medicine, industry, etc.




Chapter 7: Atomic Structure and Chemical Bonding




This chapter explains the atomic structure and chemical bonding of elements and compounds. It describes the subatomic particles such as protons, neutrons, and electrons. It also explains the concepts of atomic number, mass number, isotopes, electronic configuration, valence electrons, etc. It also discusses the types and formation of chemical bonds such as ionic bonds, covalent bonds, metallic bonds, etc.


Some of the key points of this chapter are:



  • An atom is the smallest particle of an element that can take part in a chemical reaction.



  • An atom consists of three subatomic particles: protons (positively charged), neutrons (neutral), and electrons (negatively charged).



  • The protons and neutrons are located in the nucleus (center) of the atom while the electrons are distributed in shells (orbits) around the nucleus.



  • The atomic number of an element is the number of protons in its atom.



  • The mass number of an element is the sum of the number of protons and neutrons in its atom.



  • Isotopes are atoms of the same element that have different mass numbers due to different numbers of neutrons.



  • The electronic configuration of an element is the arrangement of electrons in its shells according to certain rules.



  • The valence electrons are the electrons present in the outermost shell of an atom.



  • A chemical bond is a force of attraction that holds two or more atoms together to form a stable molecule or compound.



  • An ionic bond is a chemical bond formed by the transfer of electrons from one atom to another resulting in oppositely charged ions that attract each other.



  • A covalent bond is a chemical bond formed by the sharing of electrons between two or more atoms resulting in neutral molecules that share electron pairs.



  • A metallic bond is a chemical bond formed by the attraction between positively charged metal ions and delocalized electrons resulting in metallic luster, conductivity, malleability, etc.



Chapter 8: The Periodic Table




This chapter deals with the periodic table, which is a systematic arrangement of elements based on their atomic number and electronic configuration. It explains the history, features, and trends of the periodic table. It also discusses the classification of elements into groups, periods, blocks, and families.


Some of the key points of this chapter are:



  • The periodic table was developed by Dmitri Mendeleev in 1869 by arranging the elements in order of increasing atomic mass and grouping them according to their chemical properties.



  • The modern periodic table is based on the periodic law, which states that the physical and chemical properties of elements are a periodic function of their atomic number.



  • The modern periodic table consists of 18 vertical columns called groups and 7 horizontal rows called periods.



  • The elements are also divided into four blocks according to their outermost shell: s-block (groups 1 and 2), p-block (groups 13 to 18), d-block (groups 3 to 12), and f-block (lanthanides and actinides).



  • The elements in a group have similar chemical properties and valency due to the same number of valence electrons.



  • The elements in a period have different chemical properties and valency due to the different number of shells and valence electrons.



  • The periodic table shows various trends in the physical and chemical properties of elements such as atomic size, ionization energy, electronegativity, metallic character, etc.



  • The elements are also classified into families based on their common characteristics such as alkali metals (group 1), alkaline earth metals (group 2), halogens (group 17), noble gases (group 18), etc.




Chapter 9: Study of the First Element - Hydrogen




This chapter explains the study of hydrogen, which is the first and simplest element in the periodic table. It describes the occurrence, preparation, properties, and uses of hydrogen. It also discusses the isotopes, compounds, and reactions of hydrogen. It also introduces the concept of hydrogen economy and fuel cells.


Some of the key points of this chapter are:



  • Hydrogen is a colourless, odourless, tasteless, and highly flammable gas with the symbol H and atomic number 1.



  • Hydrogen is the most abundant element in the universe and is found in various forms such as water, hydrocarbons, acids, bases, etc.



  • Hydrogen can be prepared by various methods such as electrolysis of water, reaction of metals with acids or water, reaction of steam with hydrocarbons or coal, etc.



  • Hydrogen has many physical and chemical properties such as low density, high melting point, high boiling point, high heat capacity, high heat of combustion, high ionization energy, high electronegativity, etc.



  • Hydrogen has many uses such as in the production of ammonia, methanol, hydrogen peroxide, etc., in the synthesis of organic compounds, in the metallurgy of metals, in the welding and cutting of metals, etc.



  • Hydrogen has three isotopes: protium (H-1), deuterium (H-2), and tritium (H-3).



  • Hydrogen forms various compounds such as hydrides (with metals), covalent compounds (with non-metals), interstitial compounds (with transition metals), etc.



  • Hydrogen undergoes various reactions such as combustion (with oxygen), reduction (with halogens or oxides), oxidation (with oxygen or oxidizing agents), displacement (with metals or non-metals), etc.



  • Hydrogen economy is a concept of using hydrogen as a clean and renewable source of energy for various purposes such as transportation, heating, lighting, etc.



  • Fuel cells are devices that convert chemical energy into electrical energy by using hydrogen and oxygen as fuels and producing water as a by-product.




Chapter 10: Study of Gas - Oxygen




This chapter explains the study of oxygen, which is one of the most important and abundant gases in the atmosphere. It describes the occurrence, preparation, properties, and uses of oxygen. It also discusses the allotropes, compounds, and reactions of oxygen. It also introduces the concept of ozone layer and its depletion.


Some of the key points of this chapter are:



  • Oxygen is a colourless, odourless, tasteless, and slightly soluble gas with the symbol O and atomic number 8.



Oxygen constitutes about 21% of the air by volume and about 46% of the earth's crust by m


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